The Competence Goals

The Competence Goals for Basic Skills for Adults establish national standards for reading and writing, mathematics, digital competence and oral communication.

The Competence Goals are examples of local curricula in basic skills for adults. They are based on the curricula in the Knowledge Promotion Reform and the Framework for Basic Skills prepared by the Norwegian Directorate of Education and Training.

The Competence Goals are a revised version of the Competence Goals in Basic Skills for Adults. They can be used as an aid in adapting learning content to adults, irrespective of the setting in which this learning takes place. The example of a local curriculum in reading and writing as a basic skill has been developed with a view to training of adults. In addition, it may be suitable for some students at the lower and upper secondary levels.

The Competence Goals gives examples of how the skills can be used in adults’ everyday life, working life and in educational activities. The examples are not exhaustive and in a training situation they should be adapted and supplemented with other examples and illustrations that are relevant to the participants.

The competence goals are divided into three levels which describe the advancing abilities and the intended learning outcomes for each of the basic skill.

Literacy

Reading means to create meaning in the widest sense and gives insight into other people’s experience, opinion and knowledge independent of time and place. Writing involves expressing oneself understandably and appropriately about different topics and communicating with others in the written mode.

  • An ability to read and write at level 1–2 includes reading and writing brief and familiar texts that one encounters frequently. Some support may be needed when reading and writing in new situations.

  • An ability to read and write at level 3 includes reading and writing comprehensible texts. One relates actively to written information and has strategies for refinement of these skills. One can use reading and writing in new situations, for learning and for solving some challenges in everyday life.

  • An ability to read and write at level 4 includes mastery of formal requirements for a diversity of texts. One reads and writes an independent, critical and flexible manner and selects strategies on the basis of settings and needs.

Numeracy

Numeracy means applying mathematics in different situations.

  • Being basically numerate at level 1–2 means being able to understand simple mathematical information in everyday situations and make use of simple calculations in known settings.

  • Being basically numerate at level 3 means being able to relate actively to mathematical information and use calculation in various settings.

  • Being basically numerate at level 4 means being able to understand and use complex mathematical information and use that knowledge to draw conclusions, communicate and present mathematical information.

Digital skills

Digital skills involve being able to use digital tools, media and resources efficiently and responsibly, to solve practical tasks, find and process information, design digital products and communicate content.

  • Having digital skills at level 1–2 means being able to relate digital information when required and use digital tools, and being familiar with simple precautions when using the Internet.

  • Having digital skills at level 3 means being able to relate actively to digital information and use this information in new settings and situations. Digital tools and services are known and being used.

  • Having digital skills at level 4 means being a reflective user of complex digital tools and services. Production of personal ICT-based information is adapted to the situation and based on prior experience.

Oral skills

Oral skills relate to creating meaning through listening and speaking.

  • Having oral skills at level 1–2 means being able to engage in simple communication in known settings. The main content of messages and instructions is comprehended and simple communication strategies are applied.

  • Having oral skills at level 3 means being able to communicate actively on topics of interest in known settings. Personal interests and needs in daily life can be fulfilled, and oral communication abilities can develop as needed.

  • Having oral skills at level 4 means being able to communicate flexibly and effectively in known as well as unfamiliar settings. The adult can engage in exchanges of opinion in public and private settings and assume responsibility for the communicative process.

Download the Competence Goals for Basic Skills

Download the Guidelines to the Competence Goals for Basic Skills